Atzimba Martinez

Atzimba Martinez

WashU’s post-baccalaureate program gave Martinez a whole new understanding of what it means to be a woman of science. Not only was she exposed to a new academic environment, she has also had opportunities to join on- and off-campus organizations to help students who face similar challenges.

Mackenzie Hines-Wilson

Mackenzie Hines-Wilson

“I’ve had the opportunity to meet people from across campus with different backgrounds and identities different from mine. That matters to me because I want to support people and connect with people in ways that are meaningful.”

Robyn Klein

Robyn S. Klein

“There are a lot of excellent underrepresented minority students who do not necessarily consider our program when they are looking at graduate training. I am looking for ways to identify such students and encourage them to come to St. Louis.”

Anthony Azama

Anthony J. Azama

“Those of us who are lucky to have the ability to play a sport, I want us to be three-dimensional: To be leaders in the classroom; to be competitors in the sports that we love; and then to be engaged in the campus community, as well as in the surrounding community.”

Matheus Victor

Matheus Victor

“With time, I started to grow into the role and understand my responsibility as a minority in the fight for racial equality. I became the president of the Graduate Association of Latin American Students (GALAS) in the university’s Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences (DBBS).”

Alison Whelan speaks in cap and gown

Alison Whelan

“Universities and academic health centers have an understanding that diversity and inclusion are more than something we need to talk about. They are something we need to do.”

Ruby Arora

Ruby Arora

“To me fostering a diverse and inclusive environment on our campus means that people…have the ability to be whoever they want to be and say whatever they want to say without fear of being put down.”

Vanessa Fabbre

Vanessa Fabbre

Studying the intersection of aging and gender transitions, Fabbre found that little academic literature had previously addressed these issues and how they come together in real people’s lives. “Here are many people, often unnoticed by the rest of society, going through challenging and incredibly meaningful experiences in later life.”

Rudolph Clay

Rudolph Clay

As the head of Diversity Initiative and Outreach Services for Olin Library, Clay builds an inviting space for the university and surrounding community, ensuring that library staff, services and resources promote diversity and inclusion.